ICSA Labs Blog: infosec

Why is Advanced Threat Defense Important? Q&A with Jack Walsh of ICSA Labs

Enterprises today face an ever-evolving threat landscape with security breaches occurring at a fast pace. It’s becoming clear that enterprises must be able to not only identify and protect against known threats but also to protect against new and unknown malicious threats.

Jack Walsh, new initiatives & mobility programs manager at ICSA Labs discusses the latest rounds of Advanced Threat Defense (ATD) certification testing, and the security products being created to help protect end users against previously unknown threats.

Threat Vectors Used in Advanced Threat Defense Testing

ICSA Labs Advanced Threat Defense (ATD) certification testing is aimed at vendor solutions designed to detect threats that other traditional security products miss.  The testing is focused on how effectively vendor ATD solutions work against unknown and little-known threats.

In addition to detection effectiveness, ICSA Labs tests whether or not ATD solutions alert on innocuous applications and associated activity. The timeliness of detection and logging of malicious threats are also tested.

Lessons from the Eye Doctor: Protecting Your Identity

Earlier this month, I stopped in to my optometrist’s office for a routine appointment. The office is small, situated in a building that’s a bit removed from the main road. As with many of my previous eye appointments, I sat down with the person at the counter so she could pull up my prescription information on the computer and review my insurance benefits for the final pricing.  Apparently a password was required to access this information, which the woman behind the counter helping me didn’t have.

Protecting Your Mobile Phone from Ransomware [PART 2]

As consumers increasingly turn to their mobile phones for shopping, banking, working and internet browsing, cybercriminals have similarly begun to evolve their tactics to keep up with the growth in mobile phone usage. 

Protecting your PC from Ransomware [PART 1]

Ransomware is a type of phishing attack that occurs when an attacker sends an email that looks as if it is from a legitimate organization but contains a link or attachment to malware or ransomware.

Once the ransomware is downloaded it restricts access to the computer system it infects and demands a ransom be paid to the creator(s) of the malware in order for the restriction to be removed.

Unfortunately, even when the ‘ransom’ is paid, most often the system remains infected and needs to be wiped clean.

Why Certify? The Significance of ICSA Labs Certification

When it comes to security, many vendors consider certification of its products by an independent organization an option, not a requirement. However, third party testing is an important element when a company is deciding on technology solutions that are part of its security management program.

ICSA Labs Highlights Key Security Trends Affecting Enterprises and Consumers in 2015

Security and privacy challenges are top of mind for everyone, as the Internet of Things and mobile device (and associated application) adoption continues to permeate every major industry. I sat down with our security experts at ICSA Labs to learn more about what major security technology trends they see impacting businesses and their customers in 2015. Here’s what they had to say:

Q&A: George Japak of ICSA Labs Offers Advice around NCSA Month

This month marks the 11th anniversary of National Cyber Security Awareness Month (NCSAM) where raising awareness about cybersecurity is a top priority for both the public and private sector.

ICSA Labs new certification option - Malicious URL testing module

When ICSA Labs first started testing and certifying Anti-Virus products more than 20 years ago, there were only “hundreds” of malware samples circulating monthly in the world. Since then, the malware landscape has changed dramatically and today there are over 100,000 new samples appearing every day.

Ad Networks and Smartphones

Free mobile apps often come chock full of ads.  And it’s not just the free apps.  A surprising number of paid apps come with ads as well.  App developers typically link in one or more advertising network to monetize their otherwise inexpensive mobile apps.

Users are relatively tolerant of mobile app advertising.  That is until a mobile ad network in a seemingly benign mobile app distributes malware or exfiltrates sensitive user information without the user’s knowledge or consent.